A Meditation Garden For Your Lifestyle | gardening

A meditation garden, sometimes called a contemplation garden, is a fairly new concept. Of course gardens and meditation has been around for centuries, but the combination of the two as a specific serene spot you can create yourself is more of a modern concept.This type of garden shouldn’t be confused with a Zen garden that you would find at a temple. Many of the temple gardens in Kyoto for example are meant to be observed from a particular angle. There are also strolling gardens that allow you get a little closer to nature, however these are different concepts than creating your own space at home. A dry rock garden for example is minimalist by design and it encourages the observer to use their imagination when it comes to a portrayed landscape of mountains, rivers, and temples.This is definitely one route to go when designing your own meditation garden, as long as your incorporate a comfortable sitting space as well. Two great feature of a dry rock garden are:1) They are low maintenance. The lack of many flowers etc. allows you to spend less time with upkeep.
2) In an area like Buffalo and Grand Island, where we have pretty severe winters, the garden still maintains a unique form even when covered in snow. Using various size large rocks creates a wonderful effect in winter.The initial start-up costs for the dry rock garden may be higher due to the prices of small boulders, but yearly maintenance and upkeep fees are minimal at best.Others may wish to go a different route and create something that directly touches all of the senses. A good Japanese garden is one that has incorporated something for all four seasons into it. That way the garden is always alive and seen from a different perspective. You want to create a meditation garden that you are comfortable and intrigued in all throughout the seasons.Western gardens also tend to use a lot of plants and flowers so this may look more natural given your housing situation. The Japanese garden is often restricted by boundaries that create a feeling of it being a sacred space. The idea of a sacred space is what we are aiming for when thinking of a meditational garden. Even in a larger more open yard, for example, you can start with something in a corner and think of it as a separate but connected room. When you enter this room you want to be surrounded by things that lend themselves to calmness and serenity.A Sanctuary for the SensesFlowers create a scent memory that can draw you back to the garden from time to time. A bench or area on the grass supplies the sense of touch and gives you the comfort and stability to meditate in the garden. Visually you want something intriguing or mysterious, but not too distracting. Remember, CLARITY is the goal of a meditation garden, not a color smorgasbord to impress the neighbors walking by. A water feature is also a great relaxing stimulus for the ears. Watching a small stream of water can have a great calming effect, but because we have so many memories and images of flowing water, the mere sound of it trickling can also be a refreshing stimulus. The more you can stimulate all of the senses the more connected to nature you are likely to feel.The Sanctuary Gate You want to create a place that you can call your sanctuary. A place you are comfortable and protected in. For me, shaded spots seem to have a more enclosed feeling, and can also be a nice retreat from the direct summer sun.A path or entranceway is also something to consider as a starting point of the meditation garden. The Japanese Roji, or pathways up to the teahouses, are great examples of a space dedicated to calming and preparing you to enter a world different from the one you just left. Sometimes they can be quite narrow at the beginning of the path and I like to think that this was intentionally designed as the place to leave your problems at the door. An actual entranceway such as a Japanese style gate or a pergola with hanging wisteria for example can also be a great way of distinguishing the different areas.This site about Japanese Gardens is recommended for more detailed information and interesting videos with accompanying ambient music. Whether you are aiming for a meditational garden where you can sit quietly or do yoga or tai chi, it should be a place you are comfortable in and you can focus on the nature around you.

Simple Facts For Online Business Success | online business

Simple facts for online business success are very easy to understand, but for many it is hard to do. Here are some of the facts for building your online business and the simple fundamentals to help you find the success online you are looking for.The simple facts for online business success begin with the obvious…know what you are doing here. There has always been something to be said for education, training and mentoring and especially when it comes to online marketing. Learning how to brand yourself and your business online is a must as there is a learning curve to all of this. Whether you are part of a Network, Multilevel or even an Affiliate program on the Internet or, whether you have a traditional business, you need to understand how the search engines truly work and how to take advantage of that. Without this basic understanding and without the willingness to educate yourself, you could find yourself with the 90+ percent that fail with their business online.Once you have chosen to get through the learning curve with training and or, mentoring, the next simple fact for success will be your WILLINGNESS. For the entrepreneur looking to build a successful business on the Internet you will need the WILLINGNESS to do the work! Yes, WORK. For those of us who have found some or great success with online marketing, we understand that this has come with not only the online marketing training, but through the willingness to do the work each and every day that is involved. Your work ethic will determine the outcome of your online business.Many are looking for a way to build their business online and for the most part, make money online, the latter is the wrong frame of mind. TRAFFIC, traffic and more traffic is the mindset here. Making money online and building a successful business online will be through WORKING for the TRAFFIC you need. Take your business online serious and you will have a serious online business…or presence.The simple facts for online business success are easy t understand, yet most fail to implement. Solid work ethic and the knowledge base through online marketing training or mentoring to help you understand what you are exactly needing to do and the how to do it. Online business success will be determined by the depth of your basic understanding of how the search engines work and the effort put forth with that knowledge.

The Live Sheep Trade, Live Cattle Trade and Live Goat Trade | Livestock

Australia is the world’s leading supplier of high quality live cattle, goat and sheep exports to countries around the world, in particular the Middle East and Asia.Many countries across these regions do not have the resources or geography to efficiently produce enough livestock to feed their population. Australia meets the demand for essential red meat protein by exporting livestock for food production and breeding, as well as chilled and frozen meat products.Australia currently exports chilled and frozen meat to the countries we export live animals to. They are complementary trades that serve different needs for the range of consumers in these countries.In many of these countries, tradition, religion and lack of refrigeration means they need to import live animals, which mostly supply traditional markets.In these same countries, our chilled and frozen meat products are sold to five star restaurants, hotel chains and for manufacturing or further processing. Both trades work together to feed people in the countries we export to, and are not interchangeable.The live export of sheep, cattle and goats provides a strong return to the Australian economy – an average of A$1 billion a year in export earnings for Australia since 2005-06 – and a recent report by the Centre of International Economics (CIE) found that 74%, or A$742 million, of these earnings go directly to Australian livestock producers.The CIE evaluation confirmed the significant flow-on benefits exporting live sheep, cattle and goats provides to livestock producers and regional economies, as well as the importance of the live trade in providing producers with access to the broadest possible range of markets.It found that without the trade saleyard prices would be 4% lower for grass fed cattle, 7.6% lower for lambs and 17.6% lower for older sheep, confirming that Australia’s livestock export industry provides benefits for all producers.In 2010 Australia’s livestock export industry provided an important additional market for sheep, cattle and goat producers while underpinning domestic livestock prices.2.978 million sheep were exported to key markets across the Middle East through the live sheep trade during 2010. The largest market was Kuwait, taking 1,076,455 head, followed by Bahrain with 515,731.In 2010 Australia’s live cattle export industry maintained its momentum, exporting 873,573 head with a value of A$679 million. While this volume is 8% down on 2009 figures, the value of Australia’s live cattle exports increased by A$17 million, resulting in industry’s highest ever live cattle export earnings.The cattle trade to the Middle East grew significantly, increasing 134% on 2009 figures. 226,547 head were exported to the Middle East, with figures boosted by the reopening of the trade to Egypt and the establishment of the cattle trade to Turkey. 56,441 cattle valued at A$48 million were exported to Egypt following the reopening of the trade. Live cattle exports to Turkey began in September, with 66,002 cattle exported valued at A$55 million.Despite a drop in volumes as a result of the Indonesian Government’s decision to place greater scrutiny on import volumes and reduce the number of import permits issued, Indonesia remained Australia’s largest market for live cattle taking 520,987 head, equal to 56% of all Australian cattle exports, followed by Turkey and China.In 2010 81,014 goats were exported, contributing $10 million dollars in export revenue. Malaysia remained the strongest market for live Australian goats, taking 67,675 – 83.5% of the total Australian goat exports.